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FEATURED POET
Poetry Corner
COPYRIGHT © 2006-2019 rosalienebacchus.com. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
THIS PAGE WAS LAST UPDATED ON: 22 JANUARY 2019
LISTEN TO
Fourth of July
A nation of
immigrants
A riff, a rift,
a raft.

HAIKU POEM
ROSALIENE BACCHUS
All birds—even those that do not fly
—have wings

A constant confession
Admission of omission

This is your punctuated equilibrium
And everything in between
Slow it down

The moment of extinction
The death of the last individual of a species
(Let’s put it aside for now)
Stay with it

This is our gene flow
How do you like our genetic drift
A riff, a rift, a raft…
Too rough for the second half

Take us under, take us downhill
Paint
pangenesis all over your dancing body
The new party god
Keep the beat going, don’t stop, you can’t stop

Crick & Watson
Evo-devo
This is your mother’s local phenomenon

If this is racial hygiene
Why do I feel so dirty?

Microcosmic soul
It’s an involutionary wonderland
This living matter
A modern synthesis
4.6 billion years of biology
Can’t stop the ideology
Graduate from meet/mate
To fitness landscape of sexual selection

From land over sea
It’s a hard lyric
The impression of a key in a bar of soap
A transitional fossil

Keep camping
Plant the flag
Bury the burial mound
Put the
pop in popular
And the
sigh in science


SOURCE: From the poetry collection Skirt Full of Black by Sun Yung
Shin, Coffee House Press, Minnesota, USA, 2006.

Immigrant Song
Sun Yung Shin
FOURTH OF JULY

Since the early days of my working with poetry, I thought
of my writing, in part or sometimes, as a way of participating
in larger conversations that exclude or objectify me or people
who look like me or my communities, including the global
community of girls and women.
~ SUN YUNG SHIN IN HER INTERVIEW WITH LIGHTSEY DARST FOR
MINNESOTA ARTISTS, JANUARY 29, 2016.

Poetry does allow me to communicate best what I have to
say... In poetry, language is front and center. Poetry is like
prayer and music and alchemy − condensed and mysterious.
Multivalent, a good poem or even word opens and opens into
the infinite and deeper and deeper into the self, which is a
microcosm of the universe. All living things are omphaloi of
the world − navels of consciousness that create axes that
extend like poles through the planet. Each word, which has
its own history, is like that.
~ SUN YUNG SHIN IN HER CONVERSATION WITH KELLY ENGEBRETSON,
UNIVERSITY OF ST. THOMAS, MINNESOTA, MARCH 18, 2013.
I WILL SHOW YOU
AILEE
KOREAN-AMERICAN
SINGER-SONGWRITER
BASED IN SOUTH KOREA

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KOREAN-AMERICAN
POET & WRITER
Sun Yung Shin - Korean-American Poet & Writer
SUN YUNG SHIN, born in
Seoul, South Korea, is
a poet, writer, and
educator. Adopted by
an American couple as
an infant, she was
raised in Chicago.

She earned a BA in
English from Macalester
College and a Masters
Degree in secondary
education from the
University of St.
Thomas. She teaches
at Macalester College
and lives with her
husband and two
children in Minneapolis,
Minnesota.

She has published
three poetry collections:
~ Skirt Full of Black
(2007), winner of the
2007 Asian American
Literary Award for
poetry;
~ Rough, and Savage
(2012); and
~ Unbearable Splendor
(2016), winner of the
2016 Minnesota Book
Award for poetry.

She is editor of
A Good
Time for the Truth: Race
in Minnesota
(2016);
co-editor of
Outsiders
Within: Writing on
Transracial Adoption
(2006); and author of
Cooper's Lesson (2004),
a bilingual  
Korean/English
illustrated book for
children.
KOREA
IN THE WORDS OF
SUN YUNG SHIN
[After 65 years of
occupation] Korea is a
country that was
invaded by Russia in
August of 1945 -
Japanese surrendered
to Russia in the north
and to the U.S. in the
South.

The Korean War,
1950-1953, but
ongoing as a cold war
with no peace treaty
signed, ended with a
cessation of hostilities
in which the U.S. was
centrally involved. The
Armistice Agreement
was signed on July 27,
1953.

There are currently
about 30,000
American service
members stationed in
South Korea...

The reason 200,000
Korean child citizens
were displaced to other
nations in the global
North/West - Europe,
North America,
Australia - since the
end of the Korean War
is because of U.S.
servicemen
abandoning (or not
knowing about) their
mixed-race children
with Korean women.
Those mixed-race
children and their
mothers were pariahs,
and many of the
former ended up on
the street.

SOURCE: Interview
with Lightsey Darst for
Minnesota Artists,
January 29, 2016.