FAIR TRADE: VERY USEFUL WEBSITES
INTRODUCTION

Fair Trade is a different approach to conducting trade between nations that focuses on developing local markets and
providing a fair price to producers. In other words, it attempts to address the impoverishment of the world’s producers.

The movement had its beginning in 1946 when Edna Ruth Byler, an American Mennonite volunteer, went to Puerto
Rico to work with poor female artisans. After first selling their needlework products in the USA from the trunk of her
car she founded
Ten Thousand Villages.  Her work to lift artisans out of poverty by finding markets for their products
sparked a global movement to eradicate poverty through market-based solutions.

Learn more about the history of the Fair Trade global movement
here.

Fair Trade producers of items such as coffee, tea, chocolate, wine, flowers, and craft are organized democratically.
They are paid a living wage, have safe working conditions, and use environmentally sustainable means of production.
To make these changes possible, consumers of fair trade products must be willing to pay a bit more, thereby
contributing towards reducing global poverty.

The
World Fair Trade Organization (WFTO) defines Fair Trade as “a tangible contribution to the fight against
poverty, climate change and global economic crises. The World Bank reports that more than one billion people still live
at or below $1.25 a day.1  The World Fair Trade Organization (WFTO) believes that trade must benefit the most
vulnerable and deliver sustainable livelihoods by developing opportunities especially for small and disadvantaged
producers.  Recurring global economic crises and persistent poverty in many countries confirm the demand for a fair
and sustainable economy locally and globally."


WORLD FAIR TRADE ORGANIZATION (WFTO)

Created in 1989, with its Head Office in The Netherlands, the WFTO – formerly known as the International Fair Trade
Association (IFTA)
– is the authentic voice of Fair Trade and a guardian of Fair Trade values. It is a global
representative body of over 350 members committed to 100% Fair Trade. It operates in 75 countries across Africa,
Asia, Europe, Latin America, Middle East, North America, and the Pacific Rim. Over a million small-scale producers
and workers in the South are organized in more than 3,000 cooperatives. Their products are sold mainly in the North –
USA, Canada, and Europe – in thousands of World-shops or Fair Trade shops, supermarkets, and many other sales
outlets.

The goal of the WFTO is to enable small producers to improve their livelihoods and communities through sustainable
Fair Trade. It achieves this through direct market access not available to small producers.

The WFTO prescribes ten principles that Fair Trade Organizations must follow in their day-to-day operations and
monitor members to ensure that these principles are observed. Learn more about these
ten principles.    


WFTO REGIONAL OFFICES

Asia World Fair Trade Organization

WFTO Africa & Middle East

European Branch of the World Fair Trade Organization

Latin America International Fair Trade Association

North America, Japan & Pacific Rim Fair Trade Organization (No website found, 13 April 2017)


WFTO LOGO & FAIRTRADE LABEL
DISCLAIMER:  Links to other websites are provided for informational purposes only. Rosaliene Bacchus is not responsible
for the information contained in articles and sites nor should it be construed that Rosaliene Bacchus endorses the views
contained therein.
COPYRIGHT © 2006-2017 rosalienebacchus.com. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
THIS PAGE WAS LAST UPDATED ON: 13 APRIL 2017
WEB SITE DESIGNED WITH YAHOO! SITEBUILDER BY ROSALIENE BACCHUS
HOME  |  ABOUT  |  ARTICLES  |  BUSINESS WITH BRAZIL  |  BUSINESS WITH USA  | SITE MAP |  WORKBENCH  |  ARCHIVES  |  CONTACT  |  BLOG
HOME  |  ABOUT  |  ARTICLES  |  BUSINESS WITH BRAZIL  |  BUSINESS WITH USA  | SITE MAP |  WORKBENCH  |  ARCHIVES  |  CONTACT  |  BLOG
Logo of the World Fair Trade Organization
The WFTO logo or FTO Mark, as it is known,
is displayed by authorized members who are
100 percent committed to Fair Trade. As at
October 2011, the WFTO advised that they will
be transitioning to a new logo. It is not a
product label.
Fairtrade Products Label
The Fairtrade Label, used to identify Fair
Trade products, is issued by the
Fairtrade
Labelling Organisation (FLO). When a
product carries the Fairtrade Label, it means
that the producers and traders have met Fair
Trade standards.
| 1 | 2 | NEXT >>
| 1 | 2 | NEXT >>